Reduce the waste you generate!

recycle
Purchasing recycled products saves raw materials and adds valuable jobs

“I only feel angry when I see waste, when I see people throwing away things we could use.” Mother Teresa        Only 9% of recyclables are recycled in the United States compared with Germany and Norway that recycle in the 60% range. Plastic manufacturers continue to create more plastic and push recycling. Unfortunately,  recycling is not a sustainable option. I hope you will work hard to recycle your bottles, containers and paper waste because making things from recycled material is awesome and saves lots of energy and natural resources, but as consumers we need to also purchase items made from recycled materials.

A new paradigm is needed, we all need to reduce the waste and recycling we generate. Wasteful packaging needs to stop! Make it a priority in your life to reduce the waste you generate. Here are some simple ideas to get you started:

First, cook at home instead of take-out. Yes, it is some work, but organizing to have a few meals made ahead or in crock pots can reduce lots of waste and be fun at the same time.

Always carry your reusable water bottle and reusable bags.

Be a smart shopper, always think how you can purchase less waste, especially plastic waste. Don’t purchase plastic or Styrofoam trayed produce. Many stores have cloth bags you can purchase for produce.

reuse
Use cotton or paper bags

Shop in bulk and refill any bottles your grocery store makes possible. Food coops have lots of refill options.

Choose products out of recycled material if you can find them.

Never put plastic bags in your recycling cart, recycle them at your local stores.

Please recycle plastic bags at grocery stores!

 

Precycle as You Shop #TalkingTrashTuesday

Bulk Items
Bulk Items

What is precycling?

Definition of precycle: To make purchasing decisions that will reduce the need to recycle or throw into the landfill trash. You precycle so there is less trash to throw away.

Today I was at my local coop refilling my containers, reusing my produce bags, and reusing egg cartons for bulk eggs. #BuyBulk

My 5 ideas for precycling are first, and then five from David Suzuki’s Queen of Green

First, always bring your reusable bags.

Shop with your reusab;e bags
Shop with your reusable bags

Second, choose products that use minimal packaging.

Third, carry your own reuseable water bottle, choose glass over plastic, and reuse glass containers and jars

Fourth, Bulk purchases allow you to purchase the amount you need. I fill my reusable containers with nuts, spices, oatmeal, tea, grains, beans, eggs, and soaps. Whole Foods and coops have recyclable/compostable brown paper bags for bulk items. Placing your bulk items in a “one use” plastic bag negates the environmental advantage of bulk purchases.

Fifth, use washable reusable cloth bags for produce purchases. Avoid products on Styrofoam trays wrapped in plastic film. If you purchase meat or fish, ask for a compostable wrapping.

Some co-ops have fabulous selections of soaps and lotions to refill your bottles
Some co-ops have fabulous selections of soaps and lotions to refill your bottles

Below are ideas from David Suzuki’s Queen of Green and what prompted me to do this post.  She has great ideas below to reduce our waste:

Five tips to recycle less http://www.davidsuzuki.org/blogs/queen-of-green/2015/03/five-ways-to-recycle-less/

Tip one: Shop smarter. Beware of excess packaging from all consumer goods — food, personal care products and electronics, even organic, local, non-toxic and GMO-free stuff.

Tip two: Never recycle another glass jar!

Tip three: Reduce is the first “R”.

It’s time for a plastic diet! Buy fewer prepared foods, buy in bulk and pack waste-free lunches.

Tip four: Make your own cleaners.

Tip five: Fix it.

http://www.trashisfortossers.com/   A young woman who has adapted a zero waste life.